Nowhere Wood (also known as Trendlewood)

Nowhere Wood (also known as Trendlewood)

A working party at Norwherewood
A working party at Norwherewood

Many Nailsea residents will have a special affection for the small wood known as Trendlewood or Nowhere Wood. The name Trendlewood appears to mean ‘round wood’ and the name Nowhere Wood is derived from a small hamlet linked to the village by a footpath, Nowhere Lane that still runs through the wood. Until about 90 years ago the wood contained several Pennant Sandstone quarries and it would have been a very noisy and active scene. Since being abandoned, the trees and shrubs have grown to cover the spoil heaps, and vegetation overhangs the rock face. The wood is full of birdsong and the drumming of woodpeckers in the spring. Squirrels have built their drays in the trees and at dusk the bats come out to forage.

Dry-stone walling in the Norwhere wood
Dry-stone walling in the Nowhere wood

Generations of local people have used the wood as a route to school and work. Others use it as a place to walk the dog or to enjoy a peaceful stroll. Unfortunately youngsters on mountain bikes had abused the wood and it was used as a repository of urban waste and garden refuse. The pond that was once a haven for frogs had become filled with supermarket trolleys and old bicycles. A group, The Friends of Nowhere Wood, has now been established to restore the wood and to encourage the wildlife.

With assistance from North Somerset Council who own the wood, working parties are now collecting the rubbish and installing seats, waymarks and nesting boxes. The pond has been partially dredged and cleared and it is hoped that the wildlife will be encouraged to return there.

Dredging the pond
Dredging the pond

The quarry face is the best local example of the Pennant Sandstone rock which sandwiches the coal measures, that was mined in the 19th Century in many pits around Nailsea. The stone was used widely for building even as far away as Bristol. Much remains in the undulations remaining on the quarry floor to imagine how the stone was recovered and transported.

The trees are mainly Sycamore, Ash and Hazel, and although the flora is predictable, some being derived from local gardens, it is still of interest and shows great variety.

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