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Trees in and around Nailsea by Terry Smith

Trees in and around Nailsea by Terry Smith

Trees in and around Nailsea  by Terry Smith, Price £5 Free PDF Download The book ‘Trees in and around Nailsea’, printed with financial assistance from Nailsea Town Council, describes some of the important trees in our neighbourhood, with historic and contemporary photographs, most in full colour. This 52-page book also has national grid references to guide those interested in locating these trees. The author, who established the nature reserve at Stockway North in 1996 and at Moorend Spout in 2008,…

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The Natural History of Nailsea by Terry Smith

The Natural History of Nailsea by Terry Smith

The Natural History of Nailsea by Terry Smith, Price £5 Free PDF Download One of the main purposes of this book is to show the variety of wildlife that can be found in close proximity to Nailsea. There is no need to travel by plane to see wildlife! This is a collection of colour photographs illustrating the many different kinds of wildlife and the places where they can be found, as shown on a map. The book was published with financial…

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Significant trees around the centre of Nailsea 2011

Significant trees around the centre of Nailsea 2011

Species shown on the map ‘Significant trees around the centre of Nailsea’ 2011 For the map Download here Common name Latin name Notes Alpine Laburnum Laburnum alpinum Pendulous with yellow flowers Ash Fraxinus excelsior A native tree Bay Laurus nobilis Flavouring agent in cooking Beech Fagus sylvatica Shallow rooted with good timber Blue Atlantic Cedar Cedrus atlantica glauca From the Atlas mountains in N. Africa Cockspur Thorn Crataegus x prunifolia Cross raised in 1797 Common Lime Tilia x europaea Often…

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The Tale of Beatrix Potter – naturalist, conservationist, artist, author

The Tale of Beatrix Potter – naturalist, conservationist, artist, author

Beatrix Potter was born in 1866 at the home of a wealthy lawyer working in London. Her childhood was oppressive and she was allowed little interaction with other children. She did not go to school but she had a series of personal tutors. From a very early age she developed an interest in nature which was rather restricted in London, but blossomed on the annual visits to the Lake District. With her brother Bertram she kept wild animals as pets,…

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Ivy – Friend or foe?

Ivy – Friend or foe?

Ivy (Hedera helix, Araliaceae, the ginseng family) is native in the UK and is very widespread in North Somerset, coming second only to nettles in geographical distribution. The name Ivy comes from the Old English ‘Ifig’ meaning bitter, referring to the taste of the berries. It is highly adaptable, growing on walls, up trees and often as ground cover, frequently in situations of low light intensity and low nutrient status. It may suppress the ground flora, and sometimes good management…

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Medicines from native plants

Medicines from native plants

Even in prehistoric times, men were using plants as medicines. It is likely that an early caveman might accidentally have found that eating willow bark alleviated his headache. This discovery would have been passed on to others, and a great wealth of information about the properties of various plants could have been accumulated in this way, developing into the herbals of the middle ages. Many of the published remedies were of doubtful value, but with experimentation many useful medicines were…

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Nowhere Wood (also known as Trendlewood)

Nowhere Wood (also known as Trendlewood)

Many Nailsea residents will have a special affection for the small wood known as Trendlewood or Nowhere Wood. The name Trendlewood appears to mean ‘round wood’ and the name Nowhere Wood is derived from a small hamlet linked to the village by a footpath, Nowhere Lane that still runs through the wood. Until about 90 years ago the wood contained several Pennant Sandstone quarries and it would have been a very noisy and active scene. Since being abandoned, the trees…

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Good practice for hedgerow management

Good practice for hedgerow management

Part 1 – The importance of the hedgerow network in North Somerset The quality of the hedgerow network in North Somerset is a key factor in the survival of many species that have their last European stronghold in this region, notably Greater and Lesser Horseshoe Bats. North Somerset is important for bats generally, with 11 of the 17 UK species present in the area. The quality and continuity of North Somerset hedgerows is also vital for other species, such as…

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Wildlife and Hedges

Wildlife and Hedges

Why survey hedges? a comprehensive review of ‘Good practice for hedgerow management’ By Susan Stangroom Biodiversity Officer, North Somerset Council Hedges are important wildlife refuges and corridors. Those of value for wildlife need to be identified to encourage biodiversity. With climate change causing variations in wildlife populations, it is important to have a ‘baseline’against which these variations can be measured. Hedges make a significant contribution to the landscape character of the English countryside. Locations of veteran trees need to be established. Historical…

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Silver Birch (Betula pendula)

Silver Birch (Betula pendula)

Birch trees with silver-grey bark that are a common sight in Nailsea, include the slender Silver Birch. This tree and many of its close relatives are able to survive in very cold climates. The Birch is the national tree of Finland and its habitat extends to Greenland and the Arctic. Birch belongs to the Betulaceae, the family that includes the hazel and the alder. Birch is one of the ‘pioneer’ species that establishes itself on bare or poor soil that…

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