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Labelling Trees

Labelling Trees

In order to encourage interest by the general public in trees, it is sometimes appropriate to identify them by means of labels, a method often adopted in arboreta. To many people a tree is just that, a tree, – yet how much more interest could be gained by learning some of the rudiments of nomenclature, even if it is only by the common names? In Nailsea we have been trying out various methods for labelling trees, in the knowledge that…

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Nature Volunteers around Nailsea

Nature Volunteers around Nailsea

There are many volunteers at work for saving wildlife in UK, even in our local area (Nailsea and North Somerset). In this page, I will report to you the wildlife groups that I am involved in. If you interested in wildlife and our work, please contact me from the contact form below the page. Nailsea Environment & Wildlife Trust (NEWT) http://www.newt.btck.co.uk/ Nailsea Environment & Wildlife Trust (NEWT, registered charity no 1132465) was formed in 2008 to purchase land with high wildlife…

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A Sustainable Community in Nailsea

A Sustainable Community in Nailsea

With a rapidly increasing population, the natural resources of this planet are being used at an accelerating rate. If consumption can be slowed, it is less likely that the outcome will be harsh. Although our future is largely in the hands of politicians, much can be achieved by changing our individual life-styles, acting by example, ‘thinking globally and acting locally’. There are many ways in which this might be achieved, and the following list gives examples. While most of these…

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Small Leaved Lime (Tilia cordata)

Small Leaved Lime (Tilia cordata)

Small-leaved Lime is an indicator of ancient woodland, as it rarely sets seed and so is unable to spread. It has heart shaped leaves, hence its specific name relating to the heart, which gives us the word ‘cardiac’. It was commonly known as ‘pry’ in the Middle Ages. The generic name Tilia may be derived from the Greek ‘ptilon’ meaning a feather, by reference to the bract that bears the fruit. Its flowers are scented (W.H. Fitch 1919) and attract…

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Beech (Fagus sylvatica)

Beech (Fagus sylvatica)

Beech is not truly native in this area. Only in south-east England, in south-east Wales and in Gloucestershire can it be traced back to the ice age. It was introduced into the Bristol region, but has now become well established. The name beech is derived from the German word Buche meaning ‘beech’, and also Buch meaning ‘book’. In the middle ages when books were first written, in Germany they were bound between beech boards. The tree is still recalled in…

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Trees at Barrow Hospital

Trees at Barrow Hospital

The ancient woodland adjacent to Wild Country Lane was chosen in 1934 as the site for Bristol’s new psychiatric hospital, and building was completed in 1937. Although it was requisitioned as a naval hospital in the Second World War, it reverted to its planned function in 1947. When it was built, it was realized that the hospital site would benefit from close attention to landscaping, probably to compensate for the somewhat uninspiring and utilitarian buildings necessitated by the economic situation…

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Carbon dioxide emissions from a pond in North Somerset

Carbon dioxide emissions from a pond in North Somerset

The pond in the south-west Corner of Towerhouse Wood (ST473717), near Nailsea, North Somerset, owned by The Woodland Trust, produces bubbles of gas in large quantities (see photograph), though it appears that nobody has hitherto tried to find out the nature of the gas, or proposed any explanation for its formation here. This pond (about 5 metres in diameter) is one of several along a stretch of a stream fed principally by springs, eventually flowing into the river Land Yeo….

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The Bluebell (Hyacinthoides non-scripta)

The Bluebell (Hyacinthoides non-scripta)

Although swathes of bluebells characterise the ancient woodland of England, this plant is relatively rare on the continent. Probably 90% of the plants of this species are found in Great Britain, so we have a special responsibility for its preservation. It is in the Liliaceae, a family that also contains the Fritillaries, Lily of the valley, Solomon’s seal, Hyacinths, and the wide variety of lilies, which we grow in our gardens. It is quite different from the ‘Bluebells of Scotland’…

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The Yew Tree (Taxus baccata)

The Yew Tree (Taxus baccata)

THE YEW Old warder of these buried bones, And answering now my random stroke With fruitful cloud and living smoke, Dark yew, that graspest at the stones And dippest toward the dreamless head, To thee too comes the golden hour When flower is feeling after flower. ALFRED, LORD TENNYSON, 1809-1892, In Memoriam Few of our old churches can be without an ancient Yew tree close by, possibly planted to epitomise immortality. This tree is very slow growing and lives for…

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Nettles (Urtica dioica)

Nettles (Urtica dioica)

Early childhood memories of Nettle stings are a strong reminder to avoid contact with that plant, since the effect is painful and lasts for several hours. Although it is not known to be fatal in humans, even in severe cases, it is reported that dogs have been killed by being badly stung. It is likely that the Nettle sting evolved as a deterrent to herbivores, and certainly the Nettle is a very successful agricultural weed, growing especially well in pastures…

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