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Category: Tree Species

Tree Species

Tree Health – November 2015

Tree Health – November 2015

This account is based on a presentation given by Dom Collins of FERA, organised by the Woodland Trust. It was held at Ashton Court Bristol on 26th September 2015. Much publicity has been given to Ash Wilt disease caused by Chalara fraxinea. This has now been found close to Glastonbury and Radstock, and it seems inevitable that it will eventually devastate the Ash trees around Bristol. Perhaps of even greater significance to the Ash tree is the invasion by the…

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The Natural History of Nailsea by Terry Smith

The Natural History of Nailsea by Terry Smith

The Natural History of Nailsea by Terry Smith, Price £5 Free PDF Download One of the main purposes of this book is to show the variety of wildlife that can be found in close proximity to Nailsea. There is no need to travel by plane to see wildlife! This is a collection of colour photographs illustrating the many different kinds of wildlife and the places where they can be found, as shown on a map. The book was published with financial…

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Silver Birch (Betula pendula)

Silver Birch (Betula pendula)

Birch trees with silver-grey bark that are a common sight in Nailsea, include the slender Silver Birch. This tree and many of its close relatives are able to survive in very cold climates. The Birch is the national tree of Finland and its habitat extends to Greenland and the Arctic. Birch belongs to the Betulaceae, the family that includes the hazel and the alder. Birch is one of the ‘pioneer’ species that establishes itself on bare or poor soil that…

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Small Leaved Lime (Tilia cordata)

Small Leaved Lime (Tilia cordata)

Small-leaved Lime is an indicator of ancient woodland, as it rarely sets seed and so is unable to spread. It has heart shaped leaves, hence its specific name relating to the heart, which gives us the word ‘cardiac’. It was commonly known as ‘pry’ in the Middle Ages. The generic name Tilia may be derived from the Greek ‘ptilon’ meaning a feather, by reference to the bract that bears the fruit. Its flowers are scented (W.H. Fitch 1919) and attract…

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Beech (Fagus sylvatica)

Beech (Fagus sylvatica)

Beech is not truly native in this area. Only in south-east England, in south-east Wales and in Gloucestershire can it be traced back to the ice age. It was introduced into the Bristol region, but has now become well established. The name beech is derived from the German word Buche meaning ‘beech’, and also Buch meaning ‘book’. In the middle ages when books were first written, in Germany they were bound between beech boards. The tree is still recalled in…

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Trees at Barrow Hospital

Trees at Barrow Hospital

The ancient woodland adjacent to Wild Country Lane was chosen in 1934 as the site for Bristol’s new psychiatric hospital, and building was completed in 1937. Although it was requisitioned as a naval hospital in the Second World War, it reverted to its planned function in 1947. When it was built, it was realized that the hospital site would benefit from close attention to landscaping, probably to compensate for the somewhat uninspiring and utilitarian buildings necessitated by the economic situation…

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The Yew Tree (Taxus baccata)

The Yew Tree (Taxus baccata)

THE YEW Old warder of these buried bones, And answering now my random stroke With fruitful cloud and living smoke, Dark yew, that graspest at the stones And dippest toward the dreamless head, To thee too comes the golden hour When flower is feeling after flower. ALFRED, LORD TENNYSON, 1809-1892, In Memoriam Few of our old churches can be without an ancient Yew tree close by, possibly planted to epitomise immortality. This tree is very slow growing and lives for…

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The Oak Tree (Quercus robur)

The Oak Tree (Quercus robur)

Leaves and buds of the Pedunculate Oak There are two native species of Oak growing in Britain – the Pedunculate (or English) Oak (Quercus robur- meaning strong, of the timber), and the Sessile Oak (Q. petraea – of the rocky places). These two species may be easily distinguished respectively by the presence or absence of acorn stalks. Curiously, the leaves behave in the opposite manner, with the Pedunculate Oak usually having no petioles, while the Sessile Oak has stalked leaves….

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