Browsed by
Category: Woodland

Woodland

The Glanville Fritillary

The Glanville Fritillary

Tickenham Court, built in about 1400, lies 1 km to the west of Moorend Spout (ST347715). This grade II listed building, which is now owned by Stewart Plant, is celebrated as the ancestral home of Eleanor Glanville (b. 1654), a pioneer entomologist. Eleanor was the daughter of a Roundhead major, William Goodricke, who left her a considerable fortune on his death. Within this legacy she inherited Tickenham Court, and it became her home. Her first husband, Edmund Ashfield, died young…

Read More Read More

Bats in North Somerset

Bats in North Somerset

Bats have suffered a serious decline in the UK for three main reasons. Firstly, because of the loss of roosts, since modern houses have fewer crevices in which they can hibernate; secondly since the wood preservatives often used there are toxic to bats, and thirdly since the bats resident in the UK feed on moths, beetles and other insects that are now less frequent. Of particular significance is the loss of our tall hedgerows supporting large numbers of insects and…

Read More Read More

The Natural History of Nailsea by Terry Smith

The Natural History of Nailsea by Terry Smith

The Natural History of Nailsea by Terry Smith, Price £5 Free PDF Download One of the main purposes of this book is to show the variety of wildlife that can be found in close proximity to Nailsea. There is no need to travel by plane to see wildlife! This is a collection of colour photographs illustrating the many different kinds of wildlife and the places where they can be found, as shown on a map. The book was published with financial…

Read More Read More

Ivy – Friend or foe?

Ivy – Friend or foe?

Ivy (Hedera helix, Araliaceae, the ginseng family) is native in the UK and is very widespread in North Somerset, coming second only to nettles in geographical distribution. The name Ivy comes from the Old English ‘Ifig’ meaning bitter, referring to the taste of the berries. It is highly adaptable, growing on walls, up trees and often as ground cover, frequently in situations of low light intensity and low nutrient status. It may suppress the ground flora, and sometimes good management…

Read More Read More

Nowhere Wood (also known as Trendlewood)

Nowhere Wood (also known as Trendlewood)

Many Nailsea residents will have a special affection for the small wood known as Trendlewood or Nowhere Wood. The name Trendlewood appears to mean ‘round wood’ and the name Nowhere Wood is derived from a small hamlet linked to the village by a footpath, Nowhere Lane that still runs through the wood. Until about 90 years ago the wood contained several Pennant Sandstone quarries and it would have been a very noisy and active scene. Since being abandoned, the trees…

Read More Read More

Good practice for hedgerow management

Good practice for hedgerow management

Part 1 – The importance of the hedgerow network in North Somerset The quality of the hedgerow network in North Somerset is a key factor in the survival of many species that have their last European stronghold in this region, notably Greater and Lesser Horseshoe Bats. North Somerset is important for bats generally, with 11 of the 17 UK species present in the area. The quality and continuity of North Somerset hedgerows is also vital for other species, such as…

Read More Read More

Wildlife and Hedges

Wildlife and Hedges

Why survey hedges? a comprehensive review of ‘Good practice for hedgerow management’ By Susan Stangroom Biodiversity Officer, North Somerset Council Hedges are important wildlife refuges and corridors. Those of value for wildlife need to be identified to encourage biodiversity. With climate change causing variations in wildlife populations, it is important to have a ‘baseline’against which these variations can be measured. Hedges make a significant contribution to the landscape character of the English countryside. Locations of veteran trees need to be established. Historical…

Read More Read More

Alien Trees in Towerhouse Wood

Alien Trees in Towerhouse Wood

Although Towerhouse Wood is designated as semi-natural ancient woodland, several alien tree species occur, particularly to the north of the main public footpath (W9) that traverses the wood from East to West. Some of these have been deliberately planted, while others are probably escapes from local gardens. The average age of these alien trees appears to be about 50 years. Adjacent to the notice board about half way along the main footpath is a cluster of Gymnosperms, notable among which…

Read More Read More